Just Right—Before and After

Crisp, clean lines and bold choices enliven the renovation of a dated ranch near Ward Parkway

Jerome Bodenhamer (left) and Kyle Goebel.

 

Six years ago, Jerome Bodenhamer saw a 1940s house near Ward Parkway. As a partner in JB2 Homes, which specializes in investment properties, Bodenhamer “just knew” he had something special.

Two and a half years ago, when Bodenhamer was on a first date with Kyle Goebel, they both “just knew” that this relationship was going to be special. They marry in April.

Goebel, one of a set of triplets, is a landscape architect with the Kansas City branch of Populous, a sports architecture firm. Goebel helped design the new McLane Stadium at Baylor University in Waco, Texas.

With Goebel’s love of “clean and modern, but comfortable” and Bodenhamer’s “a little glam,” they now have a home that lives like they want—sophisticated for friends, family-friendly for all their nieces and nephews, and comfortably organized for them.

But what did the home look like prior to renovation? From beige walls to an antiquated kitchen, see how Bodenhamer and Goebel’s home was transformed.

Kitchen before
Kitchen before

 

Kitchen before
Kitchen before

 

Kitchen after: two polished nickel pendants from Restoration Hardware hang over the walnut island. Countertops are Caesarstone quartz; cabinets are painted Benjamin Moore’s China White.
Kitchen after: two polished nickel pendants from Restoration Hardware hang over the walnut island. Countertops are Caesarstone quartz; cabinets are painted Benjamin Moore’s China White.

 


Living room before
Living room before

 

Living room before
Living room before

 

Living room before
Living room before

 

Living room after: originally stacked-stone veneer, the fireplace wall was replaced with drywall and Absolute Black granite for a more contemporary feel.
Living room after: originally stacked-stone veneer, the fireplace wall was replaced with drywall and Absolute Black granite for a more contemporary feel.

 


Dining room before
Dining room before

 

Dining room before
Dining room before

 

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Dining room after: a new, darker stain on the vintage table and reupholstered chairs update the midcentury dining set that came with the house. Flowers from Studio Dan Meiners.

 


Bathroom before
Bathroom before

 

Bathroom before
Bathroom before

 

Master bathroom after
Master bathroom after

 

Master bathroom after
Master bathroom after

 


Breakfast room before

 

Hall before
Hall before

 

Breakfast room and hall after: what was originally the breakfast room was renovated and became a cozy den for TV viewing.
Breakfast room and hall after: what was originally the breakfast room was renovated and became a cozy den for TV viewing.

 


Bedroom before
Bedroom before

 

Bedroom after: Barbara Cosgrove lamps top the nightstands. The couple found the pillows at Z Gallerie. The Lucite bench is upholstered in black velvet.
Bedroom after: Barbara Cosgrove lamps top the nightstands. The couple found the pillows at Z Gallerie. The Lucite bench is upholstered in black velvet.

 

Before Goebel came on the scene, Bodenhamer had enlisted the help of Kurt Knapstein, a designer and friend “who took the whole house up a notch or two,” says Bodenhamer. “First he suggested turning a four-bedroom home into a three-bedroom with an enlarged master suite, and he was so right.” Then, Knapstein strongly suggested black doors and windows, “and he was right again,” says Bodenhamer. “It’s the first house I’ve seen with black doors,” adds Goebel. “It’s a bold and dramatic look. I can’t imagine doing a house any other way now.”

Homage to Zelma

When Bodenhamer bought the house, he bought it furnished. “There were really good pieces,” he says. The former owner, a forward-thinking woman named Zelma, had brought a modernist’s viewpoint to the house.

Her pieces turn up, reupholstered or repurposed, throughout the house. The massive wood dining table and chairs look right at home 75 years after the house was built. An ironwood sculpture by 1960’s Mexican artist Jose Astuga graces the second floor landing.  A Danish modern gentleman’s dresser is now a bar in the sitting room. “We like to pay homage to Zelma,” the homeowners say.

Shiny versus Rustic and Vintage

Says Bodenhamer, “I love shiny things.” He’s partial to the shimmer or the outright shine of metallics, and it shows. The ceiling of the entryway is wallpapered in ebony and platinum that discreetly sparkles when the drum-shaded overhead light is on. The polished chrome periscope-style pendant lights in the kitchen, the custom-made polished nickel drapery hardware in the living and dining rooms, the burnished metal mirrors, and the heavy polished nickel hardware on the kitchen cabinets please him. The draperies, in a shimmery linen, add a low luster.

Goebel’s love for rustic and vintage was in sync with a younger person’s just-starting-out budget, but he was “a little thrown off by teal in the beginning,” Bodenhamer’s favorite color. “I like it now.” Teal accents appear in color-blocked artworks, throw pillows, or objets d’art. But Goebel has managed to incorporate a little of his favorite orange in the same ways. Both colors complement the white walls and black doors throughout the house.

Form and Function

“I have to have kitchen cabinets that go all the way up to the ceiling,” says Bodenhamer, so he had an inset custom cabinet design topped off by white Caesarstone countertops. “When we have people over, everybody stands around the island, whether it’s six people or sixty,” says Goebel. A mosaic marble tile backsplash in creams, browns, and taupe marble does its job while looking good.

And in the master bath the custom cabinetry, this time in walnut, was designed with special considerations for a flat screen television and speakers. Crèma marfil marble countertops and a luxurious walk-in shower help create a gentleman’s spa.

A tiny room became the walk-in closet, where everything is tidy. “This is where my situational OCD kicks in,” jokes Goebel. A built-in window seat and shelving keeps everything organized.

Hardwood floors in a dark finish unite the lower and upper floors. But in the master bedroom, there is dark brown carpeting underfoot. “The only place I like carpeting is in a bedroom,” says Goebel. “It’s quiet and calm.”

In the master bedroom, tall glass lamps with black shades by Barbara Cosgrove echo the dark wood headboard with Bodenhamer’s favorite hobnail trim. Goebel’s framed photograph from his time in Rome and a Madden-McFarland chair from Bodenhamer’s first apartment add a little personal history.

“Our favorite moments in this house are when we take our dog Jackson for a walk to The Roasterie on Saturday mornings,” says Goebel. “We get our coffees and then come home and sit in the chairs by the window that looks onto our patios.” Goebel designed the outdoor spaces to connect with concrete walkways and a channel of river pebbles. They make a statement too, inside and out.

“Orthogonal geometry,” he says.

Sometimes you just know.


For even more photos and information, see our March issue on newsstands now. 

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